HealthBeat

Chemicals In Your Child's Food?

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - A new American Academy of Pediatrics policy has been published, and it may have you changing the way you handle your child's food. 

The policy calls for changes to food additives at the FDA, with a concern for chemical exposure in children. 

More than 10,000 chemicals are allowed to be added to food and food containers in the U.S., according to the AAP. 

Plastic containers may harbor the worst of them.   

"It's cheaper to be able to just re-use it and put it in the microwave, but we try not to do it with him as much," Madi Lundgren said. 

Lundgren says she tries to avoid plastic when it comes to her son's food.  She always washes them by hand stays away from products with BPA. 

Researchers say that's the right thing to do. Mayo Clinic says the chemical found in some plastic containers may seep into food or beverages, causing a variety of health effects in children and infants. 

Registered Dietitian Tiffany Krogstad says obesity is one of them. 

"So BPA is important to avoid, but also when you're looking at the bottom of a cup the numbers 3, 6, or 7 those are the numbers that we should be staying away from," Krogstad said. 

A new policy from the AAP says those recycling codes contain the chemicals of greatest concern and should be avoided in order to limit exposure.

Microwaves and dishwashers may seem more convenient but experts say when it comes to plastic, stay away. 

"When it's heated at those high temperatures that's when those chemicals can leak out of the plastic,"  Krogstad said. 

Krogstad says those chemicals can almost immediately interfere with your child's endocrine system, affecting a wide range of bodily functions, which is why she recommends using stainless steal or glass products instead. 

Now parents, like Lundgren have one more thing to look out for to protect their kids.

To see the full policy from the AAP, click here.


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