Around 400 BC, the Jewish people were facing destruction in ancient Shushan – until a queen named Esther intervened on their behalf. Now, more than 2,400 years later a celebration is still held in her honor called Purim.

Taly Bialostocki is a local Jewish community leader. She joined us to share how we can help the community honor the Purim holiday and even get in on the celebration with a special recipe known as Hamentashen.

Hamentashen

Hamentashen cookies to celebrate Purim.
Hamentashen

Dough:

  • ⅔ cup butter
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons orange juice
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 ½ cups flour

Filling:

1 cup jam

Hamentashen fillings: Traditional poppy seed, berry jam, and the less traditional kid favorite - chocolate
Hamentashen fillings: Traditional poppy seed, berry jam, and the less traditional kid favorite – chocolate

RELATED: How to make challah bread

Directions:

Cream butter and sugar.

Add egg, orange juice, and vanilla.

Combine mixture of wet ingredients with flour and form a ball of dough.

Dough should be soft, but not sticky; add more flour (one tablespoon at a time) if sticky.

Form dough into a cylinder and slice into thin circles (less than ½ inch); if dough is too soft to slice, refrigerate for 30 minutes).

Hamentashen dough circles ready to be filled
Hamentashen dough circles ready to be filled

For each round, add a teaspoon of filling, then fold three sides of the dough toward the center to make a triangle-shaped cookie with some of the filling exposed at the center. Pinch the corners of the dough together to help the cookie keep its triangle shape.

Bake for 20 minutes at 350 F. Cookies should be slightly browned at edges, but still light in color.

Learn more about Judaism in KELOLAND:

Remembering The Holocaust through local stories

Chanuhka traditions that bring a latke joy