Looking back: President Trump’s commutations and pardons up until Tuesday

KELOLAND.com Original
Donald Trump

FILE – (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (KELO) — President Donald Trump on his last full day in office is expected to issue as many as 100 final pardons.

Since taking office in January 2017, Trump has issued 70 pardons and 25 commutations as of the writing of this article; that’s far fewer than any other recent president, though an additional 100 pardons issued before leaving office would put him in the general ballpark of the last Republican to hold the office, George W. Bush, who issued 189 pardons and 11 commutations over the course of two terms in office.

In comparison, President Barack Obama issued 212 pardons and 1,715 commutations in his eight years in office, and President Bill Clinton issued 396 pardons and 61 commutations in the same time period.

We went through the list of pardons and commutations from President Trump available on the Department of Justice website. Review the names below.


Pardons

August 25, 2017

Joseph M. Arpaio — Trump’s first pardon went to former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who had been convicted in July 2017 of criminal contempt of court after disobeying a federal judge’s order to stop racial profiling of suspected illegal immigrants. Arpaio was known for his hardline criminal justice policies, including the operation of outdoor tent prison camps in the Arizona desert, as well as his vocal support for Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

March 9, 2018

Kristian Mark Saucier — Saucier had been sentenced in 2016 to 12 months’ imprisonment and three years’ supervised release following a conviction for the unauthorized retention of defense information.

April 13, 2018

I. Lewis Libby — Libby (AKA. Scooter Libby) had been sentenced to 30 months in prison and two years supervised release in 2007 for obstruction of justice, making false statements and perjury.

May 24, 2018

John Arthur Johnson — A posthumous pardon was granted for Johnson, who was sentenced to a year and a day in prison, along with a $1,000 fine in 1920 for violating the White Slave Traffic Act. Johnson, the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion, was born in Galveston, Texas to former slaves. Johnson’s arrest was carried out on the grounds that his relationship with his then-wife, an 18-year-old former prostitute named Lucille Cameron, violated the Mann Act against “transporting women across state lines for immoral purposes”.

May 31, 2018

Dinesh D’Souza — D’Souza, a far-right political commentator, provocateur, author, filmmaker, and conspiracy theorist, was sentenced in 2014 to five years’ probation, eight months’ community confinement, one day a per week of community service and a $30,000 fine for campaign contribution fraud after making $20,000 in illegal campaign contributions in a New York Senate campaign.

July 10, 2018

Dwight Lincoln Hammond — Hammond was sentenced in 2012 to three months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release for the use of fire to damage and destroy property of the United States. Hammond’s sentence was also commuted by Trump in the same month as the pardon was issued.

Steven Dwight Hammond — Steven Hammond was sentenced in 2012 to a year and a day in prison, and three years’ supervised release, also for the use of fire to damage and destroy property of the United States. Hammond’s sentence was also commuted by Trump in the same month as the pardon was issued.

May 6, 2019

Michael Chase Behenna — Behenna was sentenced by the U.S. Army to forfeiture of all pay and allowances, confinement for 20 years’ and dismissal from service in 2009 after being convicted of unpremeditated murder and assault. These charges stemmed from the murder of Ali Mansur Mohamed during the occupation of Iraq.

May 15, 2019

Patrick James Nolan — Nolan was sentenced to 33 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release and a $10,000 fine in 1994 after conviction on racketeering charges.

Conrad Moffat Black — Black was sentenced in 2007 to 42 months’ imprisonment, and two years’ supervised release on charges of mail fraud and attempted obstruction of justice.

July 29, 2019

Michael Anthony Tedesco — Tedesco was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment and five years’ supervised release in 1990 for conspiracy to possess and distribute cocaine and marijuana.

Roy Wayne McKeever — McKeever was sentenced in 1989 to 12 months’ imprisonment and one year of supervised release for using a telephone to distribute marijuana.

John Richard Bubala — Bubala was sentenced in 1991 to two years’ probation, conditioned upon four months’ community confinement and two months’ home confinement for the charge of conversion of government property.

Chalmer Lee Williams — Williams was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment and three years’ supervised release in 1995 under conspiracy to steal firearms and other goods as part of an interstate shipment, theft from shipment in interstate commerce and theft of firearms shipped in interstate commerce.

Rodney M. Takumi – Takumi was sentenced in 1987 to two years’ probation and a $250 fine for participating in an illegal gambling business.

October 10, 2019

Zay Jeffries — Jeffries was given a $2,500 fine in 1948 for violating the Sherman Act.

November 15, 2019

Mathew Golsteyn — Golsteyn was charged by the U.S. Army with premeditated for the killing of an Afghan bomb-maker. The case was closed in 2013, then reopened in 2016 after Golsteyn told Fox News host Bret Baier in an interview that he had killed the suspected bomb maker. Golsteyn was never sentenced, and all charges were dropped as a result of Trump’s pardon.

Clint A. Lorance — Lorance was convicted by the U.S. Army of attempted murder, murder, wrongfully communicating a threat, reckless endangerment and obstructing justice, and sentenced to 19 years’ confinement and dismissal from service in 2013. A war criminal, Lorance ordered his soldiers to open fire on three Afghan men who were on a motorcycle.

February 18, 2020

Angela Ronae Stanton — Stanton received time served and three years’ supervised release conditioned upon six months’ home confinement in 2007 after being charged for conspiracy to transport in interstate commerce a stolen motor vehicle and tampering with a Vehicle Identification Number.

Ariel Manuel Friedler — Friedler was sentenced in 2014 to two months’ imprisonment, one year’s supervised release conditioned upon $274,197.60 restitution and a $250,000 fine for conspiring to access a protected computer without authorization.

David Hossein Safavian — Safavian was charged with obstruction and making false statements, and received 72 months’ imprisonment with two years’ supervised release in 2006.

Michael Robert Milken — Milken was sentenced in 1992 to 24 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release, 5,400 hours of community service and a $200 million fine for charges of conspiracy, securities fraud, mail fraud, tax fraud, filing false reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission and assisting a brokerage firm in violating its net capital requirements.

Paul Harvey Pogue — Pogue received a sentence of three years’ probation, a $250,000 fine and $473,604.09 restitution in 2010 for making and subscribing a false tax return.

Bernard Bailey Kerik — Kerik received 8 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release and $187,931 restitution in 2010 for obstructing the administration of the Internal Revenue Laws, aiding in the preparation of a false income tax return, making false statements on a loan application and making false statements.

Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. — DeBartolo was sentenced in 1998 to two years’ probation, a $250,000 fine and $350,000 restitution for misprision of a felony.

August 18, 2020

Susan B. Anthony — Another posthumous pardon was granted woman’s rights icon Susan B. Anthony, who was fined $100 and the cost of prosecution for illegal voting in 1872. At the time of her arrest women in the United States did not have the right to vote.

August 25, 2020

Jon Donyae Ponder — Ponder was sentenced to 63 months’ imprisonment with 36 months’ supervised release and $6,165 restitution in 2005 for bank robbery and interference with commerce by armed robbery.

August 28, 2020

Alice Marie Johnson — Johnson was given life in prison with five years’ supervised release in 1997 stemming from a litany of charges including attempted possession of cocaine with intent to distribute, laundering $1.5 million and structuring monetary charges. Johnson’s sentence had already been commuted by President Trump in 2018.

November 25, 2020

Michael T. Flynn — Former General Michael Flynn was facing charges of making false statements to federal investigators. Flynn had twice pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in relation to a federal probe into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. Flynn was not sentenced, and all charges were dropped as a result of the pardon. Flynn has been a vocal proponent of the QAnon conspiracy theory, using QAnon hashtags in posts and seeming pledging allegiance to “Q” along with his family in a video he posted online over the July 4th weekend in 2020.

December 22, 2020

Phillip Kay Lyman — Lyman was sentenced to 36 months’ probation conditioned upon 10 days’ incarceration, a $1,000 fine and $95,955.61 restitution in 2015 after conviction of conspiracy to operate off-road vehicles on public land closed to off-road vehicles, and operation of off-road vehicle on public lands closed to off-road vehicles.

Otis Gordon — Gordon was sentenced to 85 or 86 months’ imprisonment (as amended) and 48 months’ supervised release for the sale, distribution or dispensing of a controlled substance.

Weldon Hal Angelos — Angelos received 660 months and one day’s imprisonment, and 36 months’ supervised release in 2004 for possession with intent to distribute marijuana, possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, possession of a stolen firearm, possession of a firearm with a removed serial number, use of a controlled substance in possession of a firearm and money laundering.

Alex Van Der Zwaan — Van Der Zwaan was charged with making false statements, and sentenced in 2018 to 30 days’ imprisonment, two months’ supervised release conditioned upon compliance with the immigration process of the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement and a $20,000 fine. Van Der Zwaan admitted to lying to the FBI and lawyers for Special Council Mueller’s office in the course of the Russia probe.

George Papadopoulos — Papadopoulos, a member of Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was sentenced in 2018 to 14 days’ imprisonment, 12 months’ supervised release conditioned upon 200 hours’ community service within 11 months and a $9,5000 fine after pleading guilty to making false statements to the FBI while being interviewed about connections between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Christopher Carl Collins — Collins received 26 months’ imprisonment, one year’s supervised release and a $200,000 fine for conspiracy to commit securities fraud and making false statements.

Duncan D. Hunter — A former U.S. Representative for California’s 50th congressional district, Hunter was sentenced to 11 months’ imprisonment and three years’ supervised release for conspiracy to commit offenses including the misuse of campaign funds.

Alfonso Antonio Costa — Costa received three years’ probation, conditioned upon one year’s home confinement and 100 hours’ community service, a $250,000 fine and $44,579.47 restitution for health care fraud.

Jose Alonso Compean — Compean, a former U.S. Border Patrol agent was sentenced in 2006 to 144 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and a $2,000 fine for assault with a dangerous weapon, and aiding and abetting, assault with serious bodily injury, and aiding and abetting, discharge of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence and deprivation of rights under color of law.

Ignacio Ramos — Ramo, also a former U.S. Border Patrol agent was sentenced to 132 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and a $2,000 fine in 2006, also for assault with a dangerous weapon, and aiding and abetting, assault with serious bodily injury, and aiding and abetting, discharge of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence and deprivation of rights under color of law.

Alfred Lee Crum — Crum received 18 months’ imprisonment, suspended, three years’ probation and a $250 fine in 1952 for Illegally operating a still, unlawful possession of a still and operating without bond.

Also on December 22, Trump granted pardons to Paul Alvin Slough, Nicholas Abram Slatten, Evan Shawn Liberty and Dustin Laurent Heard.

Slatten was convicted of murder in the first degree and sentenced to life in prison in 2019, and Slough, Liberty and Heard were all sentenced in 2015 to 180 months, 168 months and 151 months in prison respectively for the charges of voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (eight counts), attempt to commit voluntary manslaughter, aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done (12 counts), using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence and aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done.

The four men, all former employees of the now-defunct private security firm Blackwater USA, were charged after the 2007 massacre of 14 unarmed civilians at Nisur Square in Baghdad.

Blackwater was founded by Erik Prince, brother of Trump’s Secretary of Education, Betsy Devos.

December 23, 2020

Roger Joseph Stone Jr. — Stone, a long-time friend and ally of President Trump was found guilty of obstruction of proceeding, making false statements (five counts) and witness tampering in relation to the Russia probe. Stone was sentenced to 40 months’ imprisonment, 24 months’ supervised release conditioned upon performance of 250 hours’ community service and a $20,000.00 fine. Stone’s sentence was first commuted by the President on July 10, 2020.

Paul J. Manafort — Another long-time friend and advisor to the President, Manafort acted as chair for the Trump campaign between June and August of 2016. Manafort was first sentenced on March 7, 2019 to 47 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release, a $50,000 fine and $25,497,487.60 restitution for numerous tax fraud and banking fraud charges. He was next sentenced on March 13, 2020 to 73 months’ imprisonment, 36 months’ supervised release (concurrent) and $6,164,032 restitution for conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice by lying to the FBI when being interviewed as part of the Russia probe.

Margaret E. Hunter — Margaret Hunter, wife to former Rep. Duncan Hunter (R), who appears further up this list, was sentenced to 2020 to three years’ probation conditioned upon eight months’ home confinement for conspiring with her husband to commit offenses.

Charles Kushner — Charles Kushner, father to white house advisor and Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, was sentenced in 2005 to 24 months’ imprisonment, two years’ supervised release and a $40,000 fine for charges including fraud and making false statements, as well as retaliating against witnesses in his case.

William Plemons — Plemons was sentenced on three occasions in 1998, 1999 and 2004 to a total of 66 months in prison, a $20,000 fine and $1,100,000 restitution for charges of structuring transactions to avoid reporting requirements, tax evasion and wire fraud.

Topeka Kimberly Sam — Sam was sentenced in 2013 to 52 months’ imprisonment as a result of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride.

Peter Y. Atkinson — Atkinson received 345 days’ imprisonment (time already served), three years’ supervised release and a $3,000 fine in 2007 for mail fraud.

John A. Boultbee — Boultbee was sentenced to 329 days’ imprisonment (time already served), a $500 fine and $15,000 restitution in 2011 for mail fraud.

Andrew Barron Worden — Worden was sentenced to two years’ probation conditioned upon 100 hours’ community service per year and continued payment of balance owing to the Securities and Exchange Commission for wire fraud in 1995.

Mary Ballard McCarty — McCarty received 42 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release and a $100,000 fine for conspiracy to commit honest services fraud.

James J. Kassouf — Kassouf received one year’s probation conditioned upon four months’ home confinement, a $10,000 fine and restitution in accordance with a plea agreement in 1999 for tax fraud.

John Frederick Tate — Tate was sentenced to two years’ probation conditioned upon six months’ home confinement and 160 hours’ community service and a $10,000 fine in 2016 for charges including conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States, and causing false campaign contribution reports.

Christopher Michael Wade — Wade’s charges and sentence are unknown, as they are under seal.

Joseph Martin Stephens — Stephens received 18 months’ imprisonment, three years’ supervised release and a $2,500 fine in 2012 for a probation revocation.

Christopher II X — Christopher II X received five sentences in 1985, 1986, 1990 and 1992 for a total of 4.5 years in prison for conspiracy to distribute cocaine in 1985, and then for probation violations in ’86, ’90 and ’92.

Cesar Agusto Lozada — Lozada received 14 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised released in 2005 for conspiracy to distribute marijuana.

Rickey Ivan Kanter — Kanter was sentenced to 12 months and one day’s imprisonment, two years’ supervised release and a $50,000 fine in 2011 for mail fraud.

Stephanie Christine Mohr — Mohr received 120 months’ imprisonment with two years’ supervised release in 2001 for deprivation of rights under color of law.

Robert Edward Coughlin II — Coughlin was sentenced in 2009 to time served, three years’ probation conditioned upon 30 days in a halfway house and 200 hours of community service, as well as a $2,000 fine after being convicted for a conflict of interest.

Mark Siljander — Siljander received 12 months and one day’s imprisonment with six months’ supervised release in 2012 for obstructing justice and failing to register as a foreign agent.

James Harutun Batmasian — In 2008, Batmasian was sentenced to eight months’ imprisonment with two years’ supervised release for tax evasion.

Gary Mark Brugman — Brugman received 27 months’ imprisonment with two years’ supervised release in 2003 for deprivation of rights under color of law.

Joseph Occhipinti — Occhipinti received 37 months’ imprisonment (commuted to time served on January 15, 1993) with two years’ supervised release in 1991 for conspiracy to violate civil rights, deprivation of rights under color of law and making false statements.

Rebekah Kay Charleston — Charleston received 13 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release in 2003 for conspiracy to commit tax evasion.

Russell Paul Plaisance — Plaisance was sentenced in 1987 to three years’ imprisonment, three years’ probation and three years’ special parole for conspiracy to unlawfully import cocaine into the U.S.


Commutations

December 20, 2017

Sholom Rubashkin — Rubashkin was sentenced to 324 months’ imprisonment, five years’ supervised release with $26,852,152.51 restitution in 2010 for charges including wire fraud, bank fraud, mail fraud, money laundering, willful violation of an order of Secretary of Agriculture and aiding and abetting.

July 29, 2019

Theodore E. Suhl — Suhl received 84 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and a $200,000 fine in 2016 for aiding and abetting honest services wire fraud (two counts), aiding and abetting bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds and aiding and abetting under the Travel Act.

Ronen Nahmani — Nahmani received 240 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release in 2015 for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances and controlled substance analogs.

February 18, 2020

Judith Negron — Negron received 420 months imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and $87,533,863.46 restitution in 2011for charges including conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud (two counts), conspiracy to defraud the United States and to receive and pay health care kickbacks and conspiracy to commit money laundering. According to the Justice Department, a commutation was also to Negron on December 22, 2020.

Rod Blagojevich — Blagojevich, the former Democratic governor of Illinois received 168 months’ imprisonment (as amended), 24 months’ supervised release and a $20,000 fine in 2011 for charges including wire fraud, attempted extortion, conspiracy to solicit and solicitation of a bribe and making false statements.

Cyrstal Munoz — Munoz received 188 months’ imprisonment with five years’ supervised release in 2008 for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 1,000 or more kilograms of marijuana. According to the Justice Department, a commutation was also to Negron on December 22, 2020.

Tynice Nichole Hall — Hall was sentenced in 2006 to 248 months imprisonment with five years’ supervised release for charges relating to the distribution, production and possession of cocaine, as well as receipt of firearms by a person under felony indictment and aiding and abetting, possession of firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking crimes and aiding and abetting. According to the Justice Department, a commutation was also to Negron on December 22, 2020.

October 21, 2020

Lenora Logan — Logan was sentenced in 1999 to 324 months’ imprisonment with 10 years’ supervised release for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine base (“crack”).

Curtis McDonald — In 1997, McDonald was sentenced to life in prison with five years’ supervised release for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine, attempted possession of 12 kilograms cocaine with intent to deliver, attempted possession of 9 kilograms of cocaine with intent to distribute, attempted possession of 75 kilograms of cocaine with intent to distribute, attempted possession of 10 kilograms of cocaine with intent to distribute, conspiracy to commit money laundering and money laundering.

Charles Tanner — Tanner received 360 months’ imprisonment with 10 years’ supervised release and a $1,000 fine in 2009 for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine and attempt to possess with intent to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine.

John Thomas Bolen — Bolen received life imprisonment with 5 years’ supervised release in 2007 for conspiracy to import into the United States at least five kilograms or more of cocaine, attempting to import into the United States at least five kilograms or more of cocaine, conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, possession with intent to distribute and conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine.

Rashella Reed — Reed was sentenced to 168 months’ imprisonment with 3 years’ supervised release and $8,254,239.46 restitution in 2013 for wire fraud and money laundering conspiracy.

December 22, 2020

Philip Esformes — Esformes received 240 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and $5,530,207 restitution in 2019 for conspiracy to defraud the United States and pay and receive health care kickbacks, receipt of kickbacks in connection with a federal health care program (two counts, payment of kickbacks in connection with a federal health care program (four counts), conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering (six counts), conspiracy to commit federal program bribery, conspiracy to commit federal program bribery and honest services wire fraud, and obstruction of justice.

Stephen E. Stockman — Stockman was sentenced to 120 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and $1,014,718.51 restitution in 2018 for charges including mail fraud, tax fraud and making false statements.

December 23, 2020

Daniela Gozes-Wagner — Gozes-Wagner received 240 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and $15,283,985 restitution in 2019 for conspiracy to commit health care fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Mark Shapiro — Shapiro was sentenced in 2010 to 1,020 months’ imprisonment with three years’ supervised release and $22,075,631 restitution for conspiracy to commit securities fraud, wire fraud and mail fraud, securities fraud (two counts), wire fraud and mail fraud.

Irving Stitsky — Stitsky received 85 years’ imprisonment with 3 years’ supervised release and $23,152,235 restitution in 2010 for conspiracy to commit securities fraud, wire fraud, and mail fraud, securities fraud (two counts), wire fraud and mail fraud.

January 13, 2021

Fred Davis Clark Jr. — Clark received 480 months’ imprisonment with five years’ supervised release and $179,076,941.89 restitution in 2016 for bank fraud (three counts), false statement in connection with federally insured loan (three counts) and obstruction of official proceeding.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Continuing The Conversation
See Full Weather Forecast

Trending Stories

Don't Miss!

More Don't Miss