User uShare Login | Register
Login
Register

Along with posting photos, videos, and stories, your uShare account lets you post Classified Ads, recipes on What's For Dinner, and Announcements.


52° View Weather Current Conditions Sioux Falls Change Location
Set Weather Options

RADAR LOCATION

TEMPERATURE LOCATION

Share your Photos, Videos, and Stories on uShare! Click here to get started.

News

[0] My Saved Articles
Back to all news

Business

Find local businesses
on the KELO Pages!

 

Stealing The Dead's Identity

January 18, 2013, 9:50 PM by Angela Kennecke

Stealing The Dead's Identity
SIOUX FALLS, SD -

We're told all the time to protect our Social Security numbers, but at the click of the mouse, identity thieves can access the full name, birth date and social security number of a dead person.

The information comes from the Social Security Administration itself and it's perfectly legal. But a KELOLAND man says it simply isn't ethical. 

The five year anniversary of Fred Blom's father's death, Fred Blom Sr., was approaching and he had him on his mind. 

"I typed my dad's last name and first name and everything else just followed and came right through. It definitely was his Social Security number," Blom said.

That's right, Blom's father's Social Security number popped up immediately on a death record website and that alarmed him.

"We had spent so much time with the accumulations of papers of shredding and burning and stamping out addresses and keeping social security and private information private and when this site came up showing date of birth, date of death, where they lived and some folks had tied in to where they worked.  And the big one was the Social Security number," Blom said.

“It’s totally legal," Jessie Schmidt with the Better Business Bureau said.

Schmidt constantly warns people to protect their Social Security numbers from identity theft.  But millions of names and social security numbers of the dead are on the Death Master File from the Social Security Administration and are available on a government website.  It costs $10 for one person's records and nearly a $1,000 for all the files. This is the data those commercial death record and genealogy websites use.

"We want all access to all this information, but unfortunately some very sensitive information is out there that really can be compromised for somebody and somebody can assume a whole new identity," Schmidt said.

Nearly 2.4 million deceased Americans have their identities stolen each year, at a rate of about 2,000 a day. Thousands of tax returns have been filed under the names of people who've died and identity thieves have also used the numbers to apply for everything from credit cards to cell phones. 

"Fraud costs a lot of money and the government says we've got money problems. Well, they do when they do stuff like this. You could have a legitimate website that would tell a lot of information without putting that Social Security number there," Blom said.

And for people like Blom, having his dad's identity at risk makes him sick.

"It would just be like taking their names and their memories and basically throwing them on the ground and walking on them. It would be like violating a cemetery where people would be very offended. It can happen in more ways than one.  You don't have to go to a cemetery. You can do things like this to violate the memories,' Blom said.

The Social Security Administration's Death Master File is available to the public because of Freedom of Information Act lawsuits.  A new law would need to be passed to put limits on the file.

Previous Story

Next Story


Comments







Sponsored

 


View business

You may also like

Bear Shatters Glass Wall At Minnesota Zoo

7/6/2015 2:50 PM

A grizzly bear at the Minnesota Zoo repeatedly slammed a 50-pound rock into the glass wall of its enclosure, cracking the thick pane separating the be...

Full Story
Presidential Proposal Would Expand Overtime Pay

6/30/2015 7:08 AM

Obama is unveiling a proposal to require overtime pay for workers who earn up to $970 per week, up from the current $455 threshold.

Full Story
New Laws Bring Changes To Commercial Driver's Licenses

7/1/2015 6:52 AM

The new regulations raise the minimum age to apply for a commercial driver's license from 16 to 18.

Full Story
Don't Twist That Oreo: Cookie Gets Skinny, 'Sophisticated'

7/6/2015 10:06 AM

Oreos are getting a skinny new look, and its maker says the new cookie is a "sophisticated" snack for grown-ups that isn't meant to be t...

Full Story
Starbucks: Prices For Some Drinks To Go Up By 5 To 20 Cents

7/6/2015 2:06 PM

Starbucks says it's hiking prices again starting Tuesday, with the increases ranging from 5 to 20 cents for most affected drinks.

Full Story


Events