User uShare Login | Register
Login
Register

Along with posting photos, videos, and stories, your uShare account lets you post Classified Ads, recipes on What's For Dinner, and Announcements.


66° View Weather Current Conditions Sioux Falls Change Location
Set Weather Options

RADAR LOCATION

TEMPERATURE LOCATION

KELOLAND.com | Sioux Falls News & Weather, South Dakota News & Weather, Minnesota and Iowa News

[0] My Saved Articles
Back to all news

Politics

Find local businesses
on the KELO Pages!

 

Small School District Wants IM 15 Passed

November 5, 2012, 6:00 PM by Hailey Higgins

Small School District Wants IM 15 Passed
COLTON, SD -

Tuesday, South Dakota voters will decide if they want to permanently raise the state's sales tax.

A “yes” vote to Initiated Measure 15 would add a penny to every dollar you spend.  The money would go to K through 12 public education and Medicaid.

Tri Valley School district, just northwest of Sioux Falls, is one of many districts hoping for the passage of Initiated Measure 15.

The superintendent there says his district will face some tough decision if it doesn't pass.  But opponents to the ballot issue say the penny tax increase creates winners and losers -- and the losers are South Dakotans.

School districts could receive an estimated $700 per student if Initiated Measure 15 is approved by South Dakota voters. And at Tri Valley School District that totals more than half a million dollars.

"Initiated Measure 15 wouldn't enhance any programs; it would just sustain the programs we currently have," Superintendent Mike Lodnel said.

The district faces a $271,000 deficit and they've cut the preschool and after-school programs. If Initiated Measure 15 doesn't pass, Lodnel says it forces the district down to two options.

"We will have to opt out of local property taxes or make significant and drastic cuts and reductions to programs and people so it is very important for our school district," Lodnel said.

And while former lawmaker and businessman Ron Williamson agrees schools are under funded, he argues the one cent sales tax increase is the wrong solution.

"I am concerned that Initiated Measure 15 is the largest tax increase we've had in South Dakota," Willamson said.

In addition to public schools, the measure also will use the tax to fund Medicaid.

"The winners being obviously these two groups and the losers being the taxpayer; families that have to pay sales tax on food, clothing and school supplies," Williamson said.

If passed, the Initiated Measure 15 could generate an estimated $180 million through a 25 percent tax increase.

The money would be evenly split between education and Medicaid.

There are seven ballots issues to be decided in South Dakota on Election Day.  Are you familiar with them all? Visit the Ballot Issues page on KELOLAND.com that breaks it all down for you with pro and con statements from each side of the issue.

Previous Story

Next Story


Comments





Sponsored
Find Local Businesses on KELO Pages!

View politics

You may also like

SF City Council Considering Billboard Moratorium

3/24/2015 5:02 PM

You may have noticed more billboards going up in Sioux Falls. A new zoning ordinance allows the signs in more places, and some people don't like i...

Full Story | Watch
Lawmakers To Gather In Pierre To Consider Governor's Vetoes

3/28/2015 12:05 PM

State lawmakers are set to consider reviving the three tax-related proposals that Gov. Dennis Daugaard vetoed after the 2015 legislative session's...

Full Story
Senate Overrides Veto Of Electric Cooperative Tax Proposal

3/30/2015 11:04 AM

The South Dakota Senate has voted to override the governor's veto of a measure that would have slightly reduced the amount of tax burden on rural ...

Full Story
Veto Of Plan To Gather Rental Property Data Will Stand

3/30/2015 11:08 AM

The South Dakota Senate has failed to override the governor's veto of a measure that would have helped determine whether South Dakota's proper...

Full Story
Sioux Falls School Start Date Voting Begins

3/30/2015 5:59 PM

Should Sioux Falls schools start in August or after Labor Day? That's the question voters can now start answering.

Full Story | Watch


Events