User uShare Login | Register

Along with posting photos, videos, and stories, your uShare account lets you post Classified Ads, recipes on What's For Dinner, and Announcements.

56° View Weather Current Conditions Sioux Falls Change Location
Set Weather Options



Share your Photos, Videos, and Stories on uShare! Click here to get started.

#3 Brookings @ #2 Mitchell at 7 p.m.


[0] My Saved Articles
Back to all news


Find local businesses
on the KELO Pages!


First Response Project Featured In Web TV Series

November 30, 2011, 6:08 PM by Casey Wonnenberg

First Response Project Featured In Web TV Series
SIOUX FALLS, SD - A South Dakota mission aimed at lowering the death rate of heart attack patients is gaining national attention.

The American Heart Association's Mission: Lifeline project in South Dakota will be one of only three programs featured on a new Web TV Series.

At the Avera McKennan emergency room, doctors in Sioux Falls can talk with first responders in small towns, like Rock Valley, Iowa. That can be very helpful when someone suffers a heart attack.

"Heart attack care in the U.S. is one of the major issues of our time if you are a paramedic," paramedic and television show host Tom Bouthillet said.

Bouthillet is the host of the First Responders Network's new Web TV Series "Code STEMI." The series will feature three programs across the nation. One of them is South Dakota's American Heart Association's Mission: Lifeline project.

"For the Code STEMI web TV series, we wanted to show a rural area that's doing it correctly. Some of the most exciting advances in the treatment of heart attacks right now happening in the U.S. are happening right here in South Dakota," Bouthillet said.

In rural areas of South Dakota it can be difficult to get to an emergency room fast after suffering a heart attack. That's where the Mission: Lifeline project comes into play.

"It allowed us to partner with first responders throughout the state of South Dakota to purchase 12-lead ECG systems for those first responder units. What that means that if you're a heart attack victim and you're 200 or 300 miles from the nearest hospital, you still will have access to high-quality cardiac care," Chrissy Spoo with the American Heart Association said.

Because, as a paramedic himself, Bouthillet knows every second counts when suffering a serious heart attack.

"When you're having an acute heart attack and the blood supply to your heart is deprived to where your heart is being deprived of oxygen, it's a severe, life-threatening emergency," Bouthillet said.

The Mission: Lifeline project started in South Dakota last year, thanks to a more than $8 million, three-year grant.

Previous Story

Next Story




View healthbeat

You may also like

General Mills Recalling 1.8M Cheerios Boxes On Allergy Risk

10/5/2015 4:40 PM

General Mills is recalling 1.8 million boxes of Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios produced at a plant in Lodi, California, saying the cereal is labeled ...

Full Story
Bringing Medical Care To The Home

10/6/2015 6:11 PM

After spending weeks in the VA hospital the road to recovery is now a bit easier.

Full Story | Watch
The Importance Of Annual Screenings For Men

10/5/2015 6:13 PM

One of the biggest health mistakes many men make is not regularly going to the doctor for screenings.

Full Story | Watch
A Pre-Hunting Workout

10/8/2015 12:35 PM

One of the ways you can protect yourself is to get into shape before hitting the field.

Full Story
Breast Cancer Survivor Benefits From Pilates

10/7/2015 6:19 PM

There are many benefits when it comes to pilates including elongating your muscles and increasing flexibility, as well as building up your core streng...

Full Story | Watch