User uShare Login | Register
Login
Register

Along with posting photos, videos, and stories, your uShare account lets you post Classified Ads, recipes on What's For Dinner, and Announcements.


View Weather Current Conditions Sioux Falls Change Location
Set Weather Options

RADAR LOCATION

TEMPERATURE LOCATION

News

[0] My Saved Articles
Back to all news

Healthbeat

Find local businesses
on the KELO Pages!

 

Treating Hepatitis C

June 23, 2014, 6:00 PM by Casey Wonnenberg

Treating Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C can cause serious life-threatening liver disease or cancer, but many people infected with the virus don't know they have it. It's important to be diagnosed because the sooner you get treatment, the better.

This is a good doctor appointment for 52-year-old Brenda Faulds. The Sioux Falls woman just found out that she no longer has hepatitis C.

"It's gone," Faulds said.

But Faulds says her diagnosis was no laughing matter. She tested positive for hepatitis C after suffering from fatigue, headaches and shortness of breath.

"When they told me my liver enzymes were elevated, I was like, 'What? How can that be?' I don't even drink. That was the first thing that came to mind," Faulds said.

Hepatitis C is primarily spread through contact with blood from an infected person.

"If we leave the virus alone, it could lead to liver failure, liver cancer and death basically," Hepatologist and Avera Center for Liver Disease Medical Director Dr. Hesham Elgouhari said.

Faulds is definitely not alone. One in 30 baby boomers is infected with the virus, and many don't know it. That's why it's important to get tested.

"I think all baby boomers should be tested," Faulds said.

The earlier you get diagnosed, often the better your outcome. You can also be cured just by using new oral medication.

"The treatment is shorter, more effective and less side effects," Elgouhari said.

Fewer patients are having to undergo injections that can have dangerous side effects.

"Depression, blood counts going down," Elgouhari said.

"According to the old treatment, the new treatment is a lot quicker because the old treatment is six to 12 months, and the new treatment is only three months," Faulds said.

After just a few months of medication, Faulds says she feels great and is back to her regular routine.

"Working full-time," Faulds said.

Previous Story

Next Story


Comments







 
Find Local Businesses on KELO Pages!

View healthbeat

You may also like

Hospital, SD Settle Over Improper Medicaid Claims

11/26/2014 1:47 PM

A South Dakota hospital and the state's attorney general have reached a settlement over improper Medicaid claims.

Full Story
Sanford Named As SD's Designated Ebola Hospital

11/21/2014 11:03 AM

According to the Department of Health, Sanford USD Medical Center in Sioux Falls will serve as the state's facility for Ebola patients.

Full Story
Sanford Named Ebola Treatment Center

11/21/2014 5:42 PM

The Sanford USD Medical Center has been designated as South Dakota's Ebola treatment facility. The Department of Health made the announcement Frid...

Full Story | Watch
Medical Marijuana Supporters Gather For Discussion

11/22/2014 6:11 PM

This morning, supporters gathered in downtown Sioux Falls looking to put together efforts to legalize Medical Marijuana in the state after unsuccessfu...

Full Story | Watch
Encouraging A Workout At Work

11/20/2014 6:19 PM

Instead of working out after work, more employers are trying to encourage employees to think about their health during their work day.

Full Story | Watch


Events