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Springtime Growth Spurt

April 7, 2014, 6:12 PM by Casey Wonnenberg

Springtime Growth Spurt
SIOUX FALLS, SD -

As the weather warms up, you not only will see flowers and plants start to grow, but your children could also hit a growth spurt. Research shows that many kids tend to grow more quickly during spring and summer.

Whether they're taking a stroll downtown or playing in the park, Jill Jacobson's children just love to be outside.

"We spend as much time outside as we possibly can," Jacobson said.

Jacobson says outside activities are also a great way to encourage her kids to be physically active.

"It's good for everybody to get out and about," Jacobson said.

Another benefit you might not know about is the increase in temperatures could also encourage an increase in your child's height.

"We have a few studies that show they grow more in the spring and the summer," Sanford Pediatrician Dr. Rosanne Bosch said.

Bosch says researchers still are not sure why children tend to grow more during the warmer months, but there are several theories.

"It would be my guess that we get more sunlight, and we get more exercise then," Bosch said.

But if your child doesn't go through a sudden growth spurt this spring, don't be worried. There are two times when you should really watch how much your children grow, and that has nothing to do with the seasons.

"In that first year the children actually triple their body weight, and they grow about ten inches," Bosch said.

Bosch says you should also pay attention to your child's growth during puberty. For girls, puberty hits anywhere between eight and 15 years old. A boy's puberty generally spans from the ages of 10 to 17.

"If boys have gotten to be 17 and they are not hitting puberty or girls get to 16 and haven't hit puberty, those are other things we should look at," Bosch said.

But with a four-year-old and an almost two-year-old, Jacobson says it seems like her children are constantly getting taller, whether it's warm outside or not.

"It seems like I buy clothes for the upcoming season and maybe before we even get there, we've already outgrown them," Jacobson said.

Bosch says proper growth and nutrition are important for several reasons, including brain development.

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