User uShare Login | Register
Login
Register

Along with posting photos, videos, and stories, your uShare account lets you post Classified Ads, recipes on What's For Dinner, and Announcements.


78° View Weather Current Conditions Sioux Falls Change Location
Set Weather Options

RADAR LOCATION

TEMPERATURE LOCATION

News

[0] My Saved Articles
Back to all news

Healthbeat

Find local businesses
on the KELO Pages!

 

Sleep Habits Can Impact Heart Health

November 19, 2012, 6:06 PM by Casey Wonnenberg

Sleep Habits Can Impact Heart Health
SIOUX FALLS, SD -

In today's busy society, it can be difficult to get the right amount of sleep. But a lack of sleep can not only make you feel groggy, it can lead to long-term health problems.  In fact, this week women taking part in the Go Red Challenge are working to improve their heart health by focusing on their sleep habits.

Rochelle Rock is like many people and leads a busy schedule. She works full-time, has two kids and is engaged to be married.

"Volunteer opportunities that you do, you have a lot going on in your life," Rock said.

That's why it's no surprise that Rock often doesn't get her full eight hours of sleep each night.

"If I have a lot of things going on during the day and am not able to shut it all off at night, you can struggle with that," Rock said.

But a lack of sleep can actually lead to long-term health problems, including heart disease.

"We've found that long-term affects of sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure. It also affects hormone levels, which can lead to an increase in appetite and weight gain," Sanford Cardiologist Dr. Kelly Steffen said.

Steffen says that's why it's important to make sleep a priority.

"Make a plan of how you're going to do it, take some relaxation time before you go to bed. Don't think about stressful things or have stressful conversations before you're trying to go to bed," Steffen said.

Some other helpful advice: make your room calm and dark. Exercising can also improve sleep, as long as you work out three or more hours before bedtime.  And don't use your bed as a time to watch TV. Instead, listen to the radio or read.

"It should really be your place to sleep," Steffen said.

It's an effort that's even more important for Rock. She's taking part in the Go Red Challenge to improve her heart health.

"My father had some heart issues. I have high blood pressure. There are things I'm learning to combat that I've already seen some positive affects from things I've learned," Rock said.

So how much sleep do you need?  That depends on each person, but the general recommendation for adults is seven to nine hours.  Children five to ten-years-old need ten to 11 hours, and younger children require even more.

Previous Story

Next Story


Comments





RELATED STORIES


Sponsored

 


View healthbeat

You may also like

Kraft Heinz Expands Kraft Singles Recall

9/3/2015 5:05 PM

Kraft Heinz is expanding a recall of Kraft Singles products, saying a problem with the packaging film affects 10 times as many cases as it first thoug...

Full Story
How To Cope: Empty Nesters Send Kids To College

8/31/2015 6:17 PM

Avera Employee Assistance Program consultant Rhonda Kemmis says worry is a very common reaction as students head off to college.

Full Story | Watch
Starting School With A Severe Food Allergy

9/2/2015 6:15 PM

From a new classroom to a new teacher, the start of a school year can be intimidating for any student or parent.

Full Story | Watch
Putting The Best Foot Forward For Kids' Shoes

9/1/2015 6:17 PM

When your child reaches kindergarten, Gupta says it might be time to switch the velcro shoes for laceups.

Full Story | Watch
Pink Week To Honor Breast Cancer Fighters

9/3/2015 6:19 PM

Grant says he started to appreciate his mother more over the past seven years.

Full Story | Watch


Events