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August 22, 2012 09:55 PM

On The Chopping Block

Nobody said farming is easy; especially this year as KELOLAND is experiencing one of the most devastating droughts in decades. While many are counting their losses, some are just counting their blessings one bushel at a time.

It's a common scene in South Dakota fields this year.  Farmers cutting their corn into silage, just so they have something to feed their livestock. 

"To the southwest, there's a lot of corn that will zero out, meaning there's no corn in it," Don Gelderman of Hartford said.

Gelderman has mixed feelings about his crops this year.  On one hand he considers himself to be somewhat fortunate, because some of his fields aren't in that bad of shape.

"Some places there's no corn, some better parts of the fields look awfully good yet," Gelderman said.

But on the other hand, some aren't worth the wait. 

"There's some harvest issues on this particular field, so we decided to chop it," Gelderman said.

Plus this field is also falling victim to rootworm damage, something that might bug a farmer in a normal year.

"I've heard it is what it is so many times this year, I can't count," Gelderman said.

Chances are he won't have to count on a late harvest either, because the sun, that's been so brutal this year, is already setting on what they were hoping would have been fields of dreams.

Gelderman says his corn usually makes 150-185 bushels an acre, this year he's thinking it'll be about half that.

  • Agriculture
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